Gary Pigeon’s New York Studio

I heard from Gary Pigeon yesterday – see previous posts. He says he’s hard at work on his new piece. Interestingly he also says he’s taking more of an ‘inclusive’ approach to this one by exploring the medium of ‘living art’, possibly involving a number of other pigeons who have either had foot issues themselves, or know a pigeon who has. He’s hoping to have it ready by Christmas. Nice one, Gary. Watch this space.

When I emailed him last I also asked about living and working conditions in New York. It sounds like it’s pretty much the same as it is here. A mixture of ledges, window sills, and derelict shitholes. He said he’d rather not publicise where he lives now as he’s managed to bag himself a rather choice hole near Brooklyn Bridge. The reason he wants to keep it quiet is squatting can be a real issue for any urban pigeon who lands on his feet. I know from experience. There’s nothing worse than coming home after a busy day to find some other fucker sitting there going, “So, what you gonna do about it?”

Normally the squatting pigeon wins. More hassle than it’s worth. I was lucky though. It happened to me twice when I was living on Beak Street. All I did was stick my camera up their beak and say I’d name and shame unless they fucked off, which they did on both occasions.

Even though Gary wouldn’t tell me where he lived, he did email me a picture of his studio:

That’s Gary’s on the far right. The rest are all artists too.

It’s located under The Highline, a recently tarted up disused railway in the meat-packing district.

The reason Gary chose to work there is he used to live there back in the day. Said it rocked before the hotels moved in. Parties every night. Pigeons from all over NY would hit the Highline on a Friday night, and most of them would still be there on Monday morning.

“Now it’s just a load of designer frontages, and not a bloody ledge in sight!” He said. “I prefer to live in Brooklyn these days. Most of the pigeons who work here are sound though, which is why I work here. It’s a good scene. We all get on and help each other. Last year Michael was working on an Origami piece involving a paper napkin. It took three of us to sort the final folds. It’s team work here, and that’s why I like it.”

Fair play.

Looking forward to the new piece, Gary.

December 5, 2013. Uncategorized.

One Comment

  1. sedge808 replied:

    fab blog

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